Category: From Delib (Page 1 of 66)

Democracy Mark-up Language (DML), the Semantic Web and machine-readable policy documents: Thought Paper

The semantic web is a term used to describe a web which is made up not just of data but of data with attributed ‘meaning’.  The result of contexualising data and meaning is ultimately ‘machine-readable meaning’ i.e. the ability for a computer to understand that the word ‘Acne’ that appears on a website doesn’t refer to a skin condition but rather a brand of jeans.

The term ‘semantic web’ was coined by Tim Berners Lee based on the following vision

I have a dream for the Web [in which computers] become capable of analyzing all the data on the Web – the content, links, and transactions between people and computers. A “Semantic Web”, which makes this possible, has yet to emerge, but when it does, the day-to-day mechanisms of trade, bureaucracy and our daily lives will be handled by machines talking to machines. The “intelligent agents” people have touted for ages will finally materialize.

Semantic languages &

Since 2001 when Tim Berners Lee set-forth his vision, various semantic vocabularies have been developed to enable people to mark-up web pages to give them meaning.  One of the leading markup vocabularies is, created as a collaboration of leading search engine organisations including Google, Bing, Yandex and others. was created to create widespread usage of semantic markup, and is broad in its scope incorporating 500+ ‘types’ and 800+ ‘properties’ meaning that can be applied to pretty much anything to date.

An example of mark-up structure, with its ‘types’ and ‘properties’ is as follows – using the website information of my local pub ‘The Duke of Edinburgh’ as an example:

BarOrPub / FoodEstablishment
itemprop=“name” Duke of Edinburgh
itemprop=“address” 204 Ferndale Road, Brixton, London SW9 8AG
Opening hours
itemprop=”opening hours” 5pm – 11:30pm

By adding this semantic markup language to the pubs website information enables Google (or other search engines / service that relies on open web data) to more easily understand the meaning of the information provided.

For example, a very important thing that it does is help Google understand that this information is related to an organisation (pub) called the Duke of Edinburgh rather than a ‘person’ called the same thing.

The result when searched via Google is this, when searching for ‘pub near me’

. . . rather than coming back with this 😉 (photo courtesy of Aaron McCracken)

When looking at’s application, one important area missing to date is democracy & legislation.

DML (democracy mark-up language)

In the context of Delib’s work, the idea of applying the semantic web to democratic processes (like policy creation and legislation)  highlights a whole raft of exciting advantages to enrich democracy.  We might call this specific mark-up language “Democracy Mark-up Language (DML).

Government policy & legislative documents are famously wordy and inaccessible, but at the same time are generally well-structured and part of a wider well-structured government process.

The natural structured nature of policy / legislation means it has the potential to be made more accessible by technology; the starting point for making this government policy data more accessible is providing an easy way to mark it up and give ‘machine-readable meaning’ to policy documents.

What this might look like from a practical perspective using, is something like this (using this proposed policy from Dept of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs as an example )

PolicyDocument / Government Work


itemprop=“name” Ban on electronic training collars for cats and dogs in England
itemprop=“description” We are seeking views on banning electronic training collars (e-collars). These corrective behaviour devices allow electronic or static pulses and other signals to be given to pets by their owners.
itemprop=“organisation Dept of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
itemprop=“audience type” Anyone
Start Date
itemprop=“startdate” 12/03/2018
End Date
itemprop=enddate” 27/04/2018
itemprop=“EligibleRegion” England
Contact Point / Email
Feedback Point

Benefits / practical uses of DML applied to policy & legislative documents

Having applied DML to a series of government policy documents would then, like the pub example, enable search engines to more easily surface policy documents relevant to individuals.  For example, instead of searching for ‘pubs near me’ a person might search for ‘What government policies affect my local area?’ and the results may look something like . . .

Or alternatively more specifically a person may search for ‘What’s the latest with the government’s HS2 policy’? And the latest policy document would appear, along with the ability for the citizen to feedback on it. + Citizen Space

The hugely exciting bit in all of these is that we’re 90%+ there in making DML a reality.  Breaking down what’s needed to make DML work in practice at scale there’s 2 key parts, reliant on and Citizen Space.

  • Agreeing the DML language (via policy documents are very similar to other standard documents that are covered by’s type ‘CreativeWork’ so we’re 99% there with the language (types and properties).  I think there does need to be a sub-type of ‘CreativeWork’ which is ‘GovernmentWork’, which includes additional properties specific to policy and legislative documents like ‘feedback’ (relating to the ability for citizens to feedback / input into policy).
  • Easy application of DML to policy documents: sure, all of this DML idea sounds interesting in theory, but given that the practical application would involve civil servants needing to specifically add code to online documents to mark them up with DML, the idea would die very quickly – as no civil servant would have the time (or realistically the technical expertise) to add DML to their policies.

That’s luckily where Citizen Space comes in, as Citizen Space is already used by a high percentage of government departments (UK and Australia) to publish policy documents through.  To make DML a reality, Delib would need to map language (i.e. DML) to the existing structured data that Citizen Space is structured around.  N.B. to get a sense of how policies in Citizen Space are structured, check out the Citizen Space Aggregator.

This essentially would mean business as usual for the government departments who publish their policies via Citizen Space, but a huge potential step change in the value that government and citizens get out of the publishing of policies.

Appendix 1: Mapping to Citizen Space structured data

The following is a breakdown of existing language applied to policy documents listed in Citizen Space (according to the policy information structuring allowed for in Citizen Space).  I’ve added some additional notes and questionned some

Citizen Space policy document data ‘type’ or ‘property’ Notes (thoughts on appropriateness)
Document type GovernmentWork [type] NEW This doesn’t exist at present.  Only ‘CreativeWork’ exists as a ‘type’
Name Name
Overview description
Area  EligibleRegion
Audience audiencetype
Interest (interest category area) category
Organisation organisation
Department (of organisation) department
Consultation start date startDate
Consultation end date endDate
Contact Contactpoint (?) Or should this be ‘accountable person’ – refers to ‘legal owner’
Contact information (of owner) Telephonenumber, email
Feedback format (online survey, .pdf, email, event) FeedbackPoint [NEW]  This is a new property and does not exist at present
Related documents Citation (?) May not work, may need other option.
Language availablelanguage
Published response comment

Next steps?

DML is very much in concept phase at the moment, and this thought paper is a first articulation of what DML could be and the benefits.  If you’re interested in discussing the concept further, and are interested in applying it (especially if you work in government policy), drop us a note:

The latest, greatest digital democracy and involvement jobs (UK, March 2018)

Looking for a good, interesting, chance-to-make-a-difference job? The world of digital government keeps on providing great opportunities. Check out this latest bunch, for instance:

Digital Design Team
Hackney Council
‘The new Digital Design team will provide the key skills and expertise required to deliver agile, user centred change across the whole range of the Council’s services.

We are looking for people with a clear vision for delivering excellent digital services, have experience of delivering transformational results and excellent user experiences as part of effective multidisciplinary teams and with the ability to inspire and influence colleagues across services to make effective use of data and service design.’
Closing date: 14 March

Digital Communications Manager
National Audit Office
‘With an ever-changing digital landscape, and an ambitious communications strategy, the NAO is looking for someone to help us modernise our external digital communications approach and activity, increasing our influence with key stakeholders.’
Closing date: 14 March

Director of Technology, Product and Delivery
Government Digital Service
‘The Director of Technology, Product and Delivery will run the Government Digital Service Delivery and Support Group. They will ensure the successful running of its ambitious programme of work with an annual budget of £85 million. Reporting to the Director General, they will have line management responsibility for 4 Deputy Directors and an overall indirect report of 550 staff.’
Closing date: 18 March

Product Lead
House of Commons
‘At the Parliamentary Digital Service, we’re transforming the way Parliament does digital. We’re responsible for the digital output of all parliamentary services. We think it’s important that everyone can access and understand what’s going on in Parliament. Our goal is to bring together the public, Parliament Members, and Parliamentary staff to inform, engage, support, and communicate through one, unified digital core – PDS.’
Closing date: 18 March

Content Designer
House of Commons
‘…focus on the development and production of engaging digital content aimed at increasing learning, awareness and understanding of the work and role of Parliament.’
Closing date: 18 March

Social Media Officer
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
‘…you will also advise on the social media strategy and work with Ministers, staff and stakeholders around the world to ensure they are using social media effectively. As real time editorial leadership becomes increasingly important in creating breaking news, views and information, your work will have high visibility and real impact.’
Closing date: 19 March

Consultation & Engagement Manager
Cornwall Council
‘Looking for a significant opportunity to shape and influence outcomes for the people of Cornwall? We can offer the opportunity to work on high profile strategic initiatives such as the Devolution Deal, the Strategy for Cornwall, the promotion of Cornish as a recognised National Minority Group and the Council’s leadership approach across key policy areas as we commence the process of leaving the European Union.’
Closing date: 19 March

Customer Engagement Officer
West Lancashire Borough Council
‘As a Customer Engagement Officer, you will support the Customer Engagement team to develop, promote and manage the Council’s customer experience process, to ensure the views of our tenants and customers are instrumental in the delivery and improvement of services. You will be the lead officer for the Tenant Scrutiny Group and will also help to deliver a Council wide digital inclusion programme.’
Closing date: 21 March

Head of Digital Services
Rotherham Metropolitan Borough Council
‘Leading a range of specialist professionals, you’ll develop a customer-focused service, which is responsive, flexible to customer needs and delivered to high standards. You will help us drive a digital first approach, internally and externally. So you’ll need to have experience of leading a major IT or Digital Service successfully.’
Closing date: 22 March

Senior Engagement Officer
Greater London Authority
‘OPDC is a Mayoral Development Corporation…Working in the CEO Office within the Communications and Engagement team, you will:
– Deliver an engagement programme and activities to support the statutory public consultation of the OPDC Local Plan.
– Help OPDC understand and engage all audiences in the area including hard-to-reach groups…’
Closing date: 28 March


Shifting approaches to consultation at Reading Borough Council

We recently got to chat with Adam Bevington who heads up the web team at Reading Borough Council (UK). Since taking on the role, he’s overseen a dramatic shift in the team’s balance of skills, competencies and workload.

Gone is much of the old emphasis on purely technical/code/ICT work. Instead, Adam has focused on bringing in more and more content expertise: when recruiting for the web team, Reading have been hiring writers, communicators and people who can produce engaging and accessible material (which just so happens to be delivered digitally). 

As a result, the team is now (rightly, one might say) understood within the organisation as more of a communications function than an internal support/infrastructure one. These days, people are more likely to come and ask them for help with wording or tone than they are about a malfunctioning mouse or the intricacies of rebooting an iPad. 

Where has this approach come from?

Perhaps this shift isn’t so surprising given that Adam’s own background is in marketing. But this wasn’t a move made out of personal preference – it’s a strategic decision, designed to reflect the essential integration of digital into everything the Council does. 

And it’s another indication of the continuing, encouraging trend towards what I guess you might call ‘digital by default’. Every week there’ll be another (un)conference extolling the need to realise the full/holistic potential of digital transformation: centred around people, not systems, emphasising ease of interaction over monolithic back-office infrastructure. And that’s good: these need to be such oft-repeated refrains that working this way just becomes business as usual.

What’s the upshot?

For Reading, the change has already made a big difference to the way the organisation works. A prime example is around consultation – a function that now primarily sits with the web team (not the comms team, as one might expect).

Reading use Citizen Space as their online consultation platform and Adam explained that, alongside bringing in more content expertise, adopting this tool has helped change the way they work. 

This is because Citizen Space is, by design, easy for anyone to use, with no specialist technical expertise required. One staff member at Reading now boasts of having the training down to a fine art and is disappointed in herself if she can’t teach someone everything they need to know in order to use the system within 19 minutes. 

This has created a different feel to consulting online. It’s not seen as a complicated thing that requires extensive technical setup. Rather, it’s an exercise in public engagement – one that staff from across the Council can initiate themselves. And when they go to the web team for help, it’s not because they need ‘someone who’s good with computers’ to do their job for them. Instead, people are asking about how best to present materials, how to maximise reach and how to engage participants as effectively as possible. Questions of good communication, not technological operation.

We’re big fans of Reading’s approach and, in our training, events and advice to customers, you’ll frequently hear us arguing for exactly this stance. It’s so easy to get distracted by the fact that ‘digital’ involves technology and mistakenly focus on the technical aspects themselves – as if just connecting up enough cables, screens and devices would, in and of itself, suddenly change the way people interact with government. 

Instead, as it has been for Reading, new technology should be a prompt and an opportunity to find new, better ways of working. That’s not just an optimistic platitude – we consistently find with Citizen Space customers, for example, that when they adopt the platform, it helps them bring in a new approach to consultation and public engagement, not just an increase in the efficiency of their old methods. 

If you’re interested in finding out more, get in touch to see Citizen Space in action.

How we work: Natalie Williams, Account Manager

Delib has got some awesome people doing some great stuff for digital democracy. We recently chatted with one of our Account Managers, Natalie, about what her job entails and how she works, to give you a glimpse into how Delib ticks.

How would you summarise your job in one line? What’s the overall goal?

My job in its simplest, most nutshell form is to support our customers. This can take the form of delivering training to build users’ confidence in using our products; providing consultancy & advice to help spread best practices; responding to support queries & solving problems; and listening to feedback so we can better understand our customers’ evolving needs. The ultimate goal is happy customers whose jobs are made easier by using our products.

What’s the thing you most get enthused about hearing/seeing from a customer? When do you get to go home feeling like ‘that was a good day’?

It’s always a pleasure to work with customers who are investing genuine time & effort into making a consultation easy to understand & respond to, and trying to put themselves in the shoes of a respondent. What’s even more rewarding, however, is seeing or hearing about what the outcome of a consultation was – how the information that respondents provided was used, and the change that was made as a result. We tend to hear from customers early on in the process and often don’t have visibility of the outcome further down the line, but it’s brilliant when we do get to hear about real world change that has been effected by a consultation run using one of our products. I’d love to see even more customers opening up the process & regularly reporting back in a transparent way.

If you could entirely solve one (work-related, don’t say ‘world peace’) problem with a wave of a magic wand, what would it be and why?
Right at this moment (you may regret asking) it would be a problem we’re experiencing thanks to an email security provider used by several of our customers treating Delib emails as spam & blocking them, which is very frustrating as it’s stopping me from communicating with customers & sending them useful information they’ve asked for!

But putting aside the trials and tribulations of the day, I’d say that a more long term problem I’d like to make magically disappear is a widespread lack of understanding in the UK about how our political systems work, both centrally and locally. Why is this stuff not taught in schools when it would serve us all so well? With a flick of my magic wand I’d add it straight on the curriculum to & get us all educated from a young age & hopefully therefore more engaged throughout our adult lives.

You work closely with customers to practically implement this stuff in the real world. How do you think the connection between digital tools and better democracy plays out in practice? Is it just a question of efficiency; is it an increased accessibility thing; does adopting new products somehow change organisational culture or is it something else entirely?

The primary benefit is definitely being able to reach a wider audience than ever before, including communities that perhaps historically wouldn’t have been involved in the engagement process. Another layer to this of course, as I mentioned above, is transparency – increased accessibility means increased opportunities to share what you’re doing and be open about your processes and the opportunities people have to influence them.

Efficiency is certainly another advantage of using digital tools, in terms of streamlining the consultation process, making it easier to achieve a consistent level of quality, and having all of your response data accessible in one place. I’m slightly more cautious about the idea of adopting new products as a means of changing organisational culture; while they can help to act as a catalyst, my general experience is that change will be more effectively achieved if organisations choose to adopt new tools specifically to support existing goals, rather than expecting a digital tool alone to make all the difference.

Thanks Nat, it’s always good to have an insight into what people do! For democracy-related stuff, excellent gifs or to chat more, catch Natalie on Twitter.

Increasing participation through ease of use

We work with a lot of people in government who want as many citizens as possible to be involved with consultation. They don’t want to see empty rooms at consultation events where people are supposed to give their views and nor do we.

There’s a genuine commitment to increasing participation. As a result, a common question from civil servants about our products is ‘will this help us open up our consultation to a wider audience?’

The short answer is ‘yes’. The slightly longer (more interesting) answer is that we have a guiding principle for increasing accessibility and participation: that the best way to open up consultation is to make it as easy as possible for people to get involved. Our conviction is that removing friction from the process of participation will increase the range of people who are willing and able to get involved.

Keeping things simple

When the UK Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) published their consultations on the website and Citizen Space simultaneously, they found that the average completion rate was much higher when using Citizen Space – 21% compared to 3%. 

In part, this was simply down to there being fewer steps in the end-to-end journey. Citizen Space lets you manage the entire consultation process in one place, from listings to survey to response publishing.

We do whatever we can to keep it easy to participate: people don’t have to register an account or login to take part, for instance. And we try to maintain a clean, simple interface design to help people remain focused on the matters at hand, rather than getting stuck on convoluted or overly-technical processes. We’ve consistently seen that keeping things simple delivers better results.

User-centred design

Visual design is another important factor which has been considered for every aspect of Citizen Space. From spacing, to font size, to line lengths, everything is centred around the user experience. In Reading Borough Council’s experience, well-presented content was shown to increase participation. By involving marketers and content-writers in the building of consultations, they made sure surveys were easy to understand and easy to parse – and response numbers improved as a result. If people can quickly and easily understand what is being asked of them, they are far more likely to participate.

Accessible to everyone

Accessibility has been meticulously considered in the building of Citizen Space which makes it available for anyone to engage with, including those who may need to use screen readers, have sight issues or other disabilities that might prevent them from taking part in consultations in person. Responsive design also means that consultations can be viewed and responded to on all devices, meaning that those who perhaps don’t have access to a laptop or desktop computer can still get involved using their tablet or mobile phone.

All of these factors combined make consultation easier for participants – lowering the barriers to entry and reducing the friction in the process – leading to increased involvement.

The aim is simple: we want to help people who are working to get more citizens involved in government and consultation. If that sounds like you, drop us a line to find out how we can help you.

More digital democracy and involvement jobs (UK, Feb 2018)

The cool jobs and exciting opportunities in the world of digital government keep coming thick and fast. Check out this veritable smorgasbord of roles being advertised at the moment, where you can get stuck into improving the connection between decision-makers and citizens:

Engagement, Consultation and Communication Officer
City of London Corporation
‘Hampstead Heath is a premier open space in North London; it receives more than seven million visitors a year and is nationally and internationally renowned.

The City of London Corporation Open Spaces Department seeks to recruit an enthusiastic and innovative Engagement, Consultation and Communication Officer who will develop and support a range of activities to ensure effective gathering and sharing of information takes place.’
Closing date: 23 Feb

External Relations Manager
Economic and Social Research Council
‘Our External Relations function engages parliamentarians, policymakers and other stakeholders to enable them to join and inform debates about current issues, raising awareness of ESRC and its research and providing evidence to inform decision-making.’
Closing date: 25 Feb

Head of Policy & Public Affairs
Basildon Council
‘By consulting with residents, Members and partners, you’ll set direction and develop strategies that will deliver our Corporate Plan. With the chance to influence resident satisfaction, as well as decision makers, you’ll be instrumental in achieving the future we want.’
Closing date: 25 Feb

Programme Consultation Manager
London Borough of Hillingdon
‘The Capital Programme and Planned Works Team lead​s​ ​on ​and manages all new build construction projects and refurbishment projects undertaken by the Council. This includes school expansions; new build supported living and general needs social housing;​ construction works on corporate building (libraries, sport and leisure centres, children centres etc). The Programme Consultation Officer will be responsible for working with colleagues to agree and implement consultation plans for individual projects.’
Closing date: 25 Feb

Delivery Manager
Legal Aid Agency
‘Are you passionate about high quality delivery aligned to users’ needs? Do you want to work at the forefront of digital transformation in government?

We are looking for experienced delivery managers based at our London HQ to lead the agile delivery of new and improved digital services right across the MoJ, our agencies and public bodies.’
Closing date: 26 Feb

Content Editor/Content Designer
Department for Education
‘Ideally you will have experience in writing content online (including in HTML), an understanding of meeting user needs, and experience of gathering and interpreting data and evidence to help make informed decisions.’
Closing date: 26 Feb

Senior Content Editor/Content Designer
Department for Education
‘In the DfE digital communications team we aim to make all of this work simpler, clearer and easier to find online, by managing and creating engaging written web content on GOV.UK and integrating this with wider digital communications…Alongside content experience, you will be able to understand and identify the needs of users, as well as map their journeys through content.’
Closing date: 26 Feb

Head of Data
Care Quality Commission
‘The Head of Data is a newly created and exciting role, forming part of our Digital transformation programme…Working in partnership with others you will define a strategy for the art of the possible, exploring best practice methods, tools and processes that will enable CQC to deliver its intelligence-driven ambitions, and drive this through to delivery.’
Closing date: 28 Feb

Head of Stakeholder Engagement and Research
Disclosure & Barring Service
‘…design and implement a best in class Stakeholder Engagement and Research function that informs DBS strategy and policy; enhances understanding of DBS function among stakeholders and informs the practice and guidance of partner organisations.’
Closing date: 4 March

Digital & Data Officer
Southwark Council
‘Southwark is committed to conducting and planning effective and efficient elections whilst improving service and quality standards and value for money.

An exciting opportunity has arisen in the Electoral Services Division to join a team currently working on the 2018 Borough council elections and planning for the annual canvass later this year.’
Closing date: 4 March

Director of Digital Services
Companies House
‘The Director of Digital Services will deliver the next generation of high performing digital services for our customers and staff, working with GDS, BEIS and wider government…Be customer focused to ensure that the Register unlocks the opportunities that digital data brings.’
Closing date: 16 March

People’s Tech Bristol

Here at Delib we like to support local events so were thrilled when Karin from Technotopia approached us about People’s Tech Bristol. Taking place on February 24th at the Engine Shed, a stone’s throw away from Delib’s global HQ, we jumped at the chance to help out.

The event is a chance for people of all ages and backgrounds to come together to explore and learn about new technologies and the opportunities that they bring to our lives. Attendees will have the chance to interact with virtual reality and robotics from a host of local enterprises. There will also be talks on the day from various local tech experts on topics such as A.I, robots and the internet of things.

We are providing our Dialogue tool for the event, to facilitate interesting and inspiring conversations around developing technology that will improve our lives. The site will act as a forum for people to share ideas on how technology should be developed in the city; people can comment on and rate different ideas allowing for constructive conversation to grow. It’s a chance for citizens to express their ideas and views about technology in Bristol, instead of simply being consumers.

To come along on the day, get your tickets now. The Technotopia Dialogue site is now open so if you’d like to suggest ideas ahead of the event go ahead and get the conversation going.

Work experience with Delib

This week we’ve had Hedley Butlin in on work experience, helping us out in the sales and marketing team. Hedley is a year 12 student currently doing his A Levels. It hasn’t all been tea rounds and photocopying either; luckily as a swimmer, he’s used to the deep end, which is exactly where we threw him from day one. Here are his thoughts on the week:


This half-term I have had the fantastic opportunity to carry out work experience at Delib working alongside the sales and marketing team. I was welcomed into the office and given practical work from the get-go and have enjoyed producing work which will be used in future demonstrations by the team. I have learnt all about the services which Delib provide and the people and organisations that they work with. I have also learnt that marketing can be time-consuming; putting together demonstrations to help customers and finding content for newsletters all take time.

I have enjoyed all the work I have done this week but the most interesting part was researching and assembling the newsletter, which also helped to give me a closer look into the area in which Delib works and what it is that they do. Throughout the week I have also unintentionally improved my typing skills as I have done more of it than usual and have become much more confident and speedy. The worst thing that happened all week was that I ate my first ever Wispa Gold; it was awful and I will never eat another in my life.

Before this week I was unsure of what I want to do at university; I will be making my choices and submitting applications by the end of this year so it is something which I have been researching a lot recently. This week has helped me to decide that I am interested in marketing and it is something which I may consider as a career path. I will look into it further and widen the range of university courses I am researching as a result of this week’s experience.

From this brilliant work experience, I will take away a new-found interest in marketing and customer relations and it is definitely something I will look into more. Overall my work experience was very interesting and gave me a good insight into something which I may consider as a future career.


It’s been great having Hedley in and he made an excellent addition to the team. We will definitely miss his help with our work as well as his constant supply of chocolate. Thanks Hedley!

Delib + Ration Club Currystravaganza

Ever keen to meet new people and make more friends in the civic tech space, Delib were the guest hosts at Newspeak House’s weekly Ration Club supper club again last night – cooking up a curry-based storm for a group of 20+ civic tech folk. 

If you’ve never heard of Newspeak House before, it’s a member’s club/space focused on building a community around the civic tech space, and runs a regular communal dinner on Wednesday evening called Ration Club. 

Chris Q and Nate hosted the evening, cooking up two different curries – a tomatoey chicken curry with a kick, and a vegetable dahl. Yum! By all accounts the curry went down a storm, testament to the two giant curry vats being decimated by the end of the evening.  

Beyond the curry, a lot of good conversations were had & new friends made. Roll on the next Ration Club!

Interesting digital democracy/government jobs, Feb 2018 (UK)

Digital democracy is a super-interesting field and one that’s growing all the time – check out this host of exciting job opportunities, all about better involving in the public in policy/decision-making, around the UK:

Transformation Officer, Blaby District Council
‘…help us re-design services for digital delivery. You will be involved in individual projects from concept to execution, helping services to create efficiencies, encouraging innovation and inspiring services to switch customers to digital.’
Closing date: 7 Feb (yes, literally today, sorry)

Head of Digital, Buckinghamshire County Council
‘We’re looking for someone with innovative ideas and embedded knowledge of the capabilities of digital technology, not just to digitise records but to help forge a vision of convenience for the customer’
Closing date: 8 Feb (so be quick!)

Service Change and Digital Transformation Project Officer, London Borough of Lewisham
‘…Lewisham Council is undergoing a significant digital transformation and these roles will work within multi-disciplinary project teams to deliver organisational and cultural change, underpinned by new digital capabilities.’
Closing date: 11 Feb

Head of Role Content Design, Department for Work and Pensions
‘…few other organisations globally provide the same opportunity to apply next-generation digital technology on a massive scale to issues which touch the lives of so many.’
Closing date: 11 Feb

Assistant Director, Policy Lab, London Borough of Waltham Forest
‘…create, shape and lead a trailblazing service that enables fast-paced, people-centred design approaches to policy and strategy development. We will design for delivery with approaches that are insight led, co-created and digitally based, pushing collaborative working and igniting creativity.’
Closing date: 12 Feb

Digital Delivery Manager, Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy
‘You will play an integral role in the digital transformation of government services in BEIS. You will have a vision for BEIS services and communicate this to digital teams and business alike. Be a digital ambassador for BEIS and help drive change in the department and raise awareness of both technical and non-technical staff of the new digital landscape.’
Closing date: 13 Feb

Social Media Officer, House of Commons
‘…play a leading role in articulating both internal and external user needs to increase public understanding and participation in committee work.’
Closing date: 18 Feb

User Engagement Lead, House of Commons
‘…work with Members in the House of Commons and House of Lords, and their staff, and administration staff from the both Houses to prepare them for the changes that will come with the implementation of new technology, and to support them through these changes.’
Closing date: 4 Mar

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