We’re hiring – excellent Account Manager wanted

Delib is growing, we have more new customers so we’re hiring for a few new members of the team. We’re looking for a new full-time Account Manager to join us at our civic tech software company in central Bristol.

100+ government organisations around the world use our products to consult the public and involve citizens in decision-making. Your job will be to retain and grow that customer base by building relationships, identifying new opportunities for people to use our tools and services, and by providing fantastic support to our current users.

This role is equal-parts reactive and proactive work: often, you’ll be responding to incoming enquiries or helping admin users when they flag up an issue. However, it’s also essential that you’re able to actively go out and engage with our customers and market. We need you to have an eye for new business, an understanding of how to expand a network and an enthusiasm for introducing more people to what we do.

You’ll be responsible for ensuring customers are happy, retained and would refer us on to other organisations. If we get this right, it’s an all-round win: we’re happy, our customers like working with us, and together we’re helping citizens connect better with decision-making.

Delib is a small company (there are about 20 of us in the whole team) and account management is key to the business – sitting between our customers, sales, and software development.

A ‘typical day’ is varied and isn’t always ‘typical’: it might involve meeting with our developers in the morning (we have a morning ‘stand-up’ each day), solving issues for our customers, speaking with them to ensure their needs are met and that they are happy, and more. Alternatively, you might find yourself in Whitehall visiting government departments or flying up to Edinburgh to present at a conference. To do this role, you need to be driven, inquisitive and open-minded, and happy to be flexible to ensure that customer needs are met. We are looking for people who search out opportunities to make things better and who get things done.

You’ll need to learn product knowledge and also, in time, become an expert in the market we work with – digital in government. It helps if you have a hook of interest in Delib – whether it’s an interest in government, in digital or just generally in doing a worthwhile job. We have teams in Australia and New Zealand and we often work with public sector organisations in Canada and the US as well, so your customer-base will be nicely varied.

We will expect you to:

  • Be responsible for a specific set of our customers, and also assist our other account managers as needed.
  • Work with the sales team to pitch and win opportunities, then take those customers through our on-boarding process. Maintain the account relationship and ensure we retain the customer.
  • Build profile with our customers and the wider digital democracy/gov community by sharing news and thinking at events, via Twitter, blog posts, presentations etc.
  • Communicate with customers by phone, email, and face to face
  • Deliver product training, both face-to-face sessions and web-based screen-shares.
  • Identify and grow opportunities within existing accounts where additional products/services can be useful to the customer.
  • Manage feedback on product improvement.
  • Help resolve support and account admin issues.
  • Work with the production team to get customers’ needs met; be able to understand and translate technical queries between customer/developers and vice-versa.
  • Seek references, recommendations & case study opportunities from customers.
  • Be aware of legal frameworks and statutory information pertinent to our products.
  • To be considered for this role, you almost certainly will have worked in account or project management for at least a couple of years, with a good understanding of how the job works.

We’re not looking for a fresh graduate (although we do hire those for other roles) or anyone else who needs the basics explained, so please don’t apply if that sounds like you.

We need you to be good with words and have a desire to learn. This is a consultative role, so warmth and personality count for a lot. All our jobs are pretty autonomous, so you’ll also have to be self-motivated, positive and determined.

Working with other time zones means, sometimes, your hours will shift (your day won’t always be a conventional 9-5:30).

Our office is a professional-yet-relaxed open plan environment. We’re a small, smart, hard-working team and you’ll be working closely with our team of account and territory managers, senior sales consultants, developers and marketers.

We’re offering £27-30k depending on experience.

If this sounds good to you, please get in touch. Send us a cover letter (to Jayne@delib.net) and your CV. We’re more interested in covering letters than in CVs. If we like the look of yours, we’ll get you in for a standard hiring interview.

We follow the HMG Baseline Personnel Security Standard and you will therefore need to satisfy basic eligibility criteria/certain conditions of employment (e.g. nationality rules/right to work); and provide appropriate documentation to verify ID, nationality, employment and/or academic history, criminal record (unspent convictions only).

We will not accept applications via recruitment companies.

Delib Goes to the Festival of the Future City

Last week I had the pleasure of attending a couple of events at ‘The Festival of The Future City’. Future Cities Catapult (FCC) collaborated with Bristol Festival of Ideas to showcase ‘the best in advanced urban services’ and innovations that are having a positive effect on our city health, infrastructure and overall wellbeing.

The workshops and sessions were spread out over three days, with everything from ‘What we can learn from cities of the past’ to ‘Playable Cities’ of the future. I personally attended ‘The Future of Metro Revolution’ with my lovely co-worker Ludwig on Wednesday and ‘Using Research for City Futures’, part of a three-piece series on Thursday morning. Members of Delib staff also visited a range of other sessions.

The Future of Metro Revolution had a thought-provoking line up of speakers, including Tim Bowles (Metro Mayor for The West of England Combined Authority), Marvin Rees (Bristol City Mayor), Peter Kurz (Mayor of Mannheim), and Alaina Harkness (Brookings Institution, Chicago).

The panel discussion – Simon Cooper (panel chair), Tom Bowles, Marvin Rees, Alaina Harkness and Peter Kurz

The session was focused on how the six new combined authorities across the UK have affected local government, what powers they have, and what the future brings. It was great to see our local mayors (city and regional) joined on a panel with views from two such different countries, and therefore hear a little about how local gov differentiates across the western world.

Peter Kurz, a German Lawyer and Politician, has been Mayor of Mannheim since 2007. He kicked things off in the session by explaining how the structure of local government in Germany, the 16 states and the form of the municipal council work. We learnt how cities split tasks into tiers, of voluntary – mandatory, and how this meant “more staff are directly connected to the client(citizens)”. We were informed about German cities currently lobbying for their rights within states, but also within Europe, Post-Brexit, with Kurz stating how important it is to use the powerful language of self-rights, especially within cities.

“Strengthening cities is a way to a better world” – Peter Kurz

Memorable quotes from discussion

The reason I chose to attend this session originally was to find out more about our new combined authority mayor and how can two opposing parties work together in a harmonious manner. Bowles introduced himself as ‘regional mayor’, adamant “regional mayors are networking together to create a stronger voice”. The role of the combined authority is to continue bringing growth for the local and national economy, Bowles expounding an interest in developing our education system.

It was great to see Marvin and Tim discussing how we can capture collective voices in cities, how behind every successful city there’s people dedicated to the task of networked leadership, and how different authority’s interdependence is important for the country to run auspiciously. Sat next to us we had a very talented illustrator capturing the moments, (link to her Twitter here).

Marvin explained how the focus on the strength of cities is not currently high on the agenda in UK Government, and this must change, with core cities collaborating to create a stronger United Kingdom.  Essentially, we must keep strengthening our communications between leaders and citizens if we want a robust nation. I got some (quality footage) of the final moments in the discussion, take a listen here.

On Thursday I attended “Using research for future cities”, led by Rachel Cooper (Imagination Lancaster), Geoff Mulgan (Nesta) and James Brooks (National League of Cities). The session explored interdisciplinary approaches to liveable cities, innovation and using data in cities. James Brooks taught us how in America, they’re currently trying to solve the opioid epidemic, with the help of collective data and partnership, after President Donald Trump announced his intention to declare a state of emergency in response to the ongoing crisis in August this year.

Opioid Epidemic data map USA

Using quantitative data displayed through maps, means that those viewing it can easily see any correlation in themes and cross reference the figures to help target help for this health crisis.  This lead on to further discussions from the rest of the speakers, Geoff Mulgan from Nesta, focusing on the means of collecting said data for cities for example, Digital Democracy.

It was great for Delib to get a chance to attend an event surrounded with citizens passionate about their city, as well as ‘experts’, but as Geoff Mulgan said, “we’re all experts in something”, and we must keep communicating and collaborating to see the changes we want in our cities, and consequently a better world. If you want to find out more about what we learnt at the festival, let us know on Twitter

Megan Tonner – Consultant at Delib

Coordinating consultation with super users

We recently learned from our client Metro North Hospital and Health Service about their initiative to streamline Citizen Space through the creation of super users (department admin users). We love watching our clients’ innovation, and Shelley from Metro North, was able to shed some light on how they actioned this initiative and the outcomes it has  achieved:

Shelley, why did you create super users at Metro North?

‘The creation of super users has allowed Metro North staff to have greater coordination and functionality at a local level when conducting consultations and has increased staff capability. As the uptake of staff using Citizen Space continued to increase, we needed to change our organisation’s approach to how we used the tool, and the decentralised model has been the perfect response.’

How do the super users work?

‘To commence the decentralisation model, frequent Citizen Space users were identified and approached to be trained as super users. This enabled them to take control at a local level within their department by doing things such as setting up news users, publishing their own and their peers’ surveys, monitoring surveys that were published within their department to minimise duplication and advocating for staff to use Citizen Space, both within their department and across the organisation. We have found that super users have also recruited second and third super users within their own department.

‘We have continued to grow our super user list through identifying high users, as well as users who are very confident in using the tool and confident in supporting others to do so. We have also approached users in smaller departments to be a super user, aiming to have at least one super user per department.

‘We provide face-to-face, individual and group training and networking opportunities for our super users to share and learn from each other, which we are already seeing in departments that have more than one super user.’

What were the benefits to creating super users?

‘We have found that staff have responded positively to the super user model and want local control, flexibility and coordination. We have seen an increase in collaboration within departments and have reduced survey duplication.

‘It has also reduced the demand on our small team – which was required, as the centralised model was neither efficient nor sustainable with our growing number of users.

‘The initiation of super users also provided opportunistic education with staff on consumer engagement.  We built new relationships with staff who we had not previously connected with and strengthened existing relationships. This has included increasing staff awareness of consumer engagement and providing education and support to staff to enable them to connect and engage with patients (including awareness of our team and what we do).’

Have you witnessed any positive outcomes?

‘Absolutely! The super user model has embedded a shared sense of responsibility across the organisation for consultations, be it with external stakeholders such as patients, the community and organisations or internally with staff. Teams have improved their internal communication and are working more collaboratively. 

‘We are also delighted with the unexpected outcome of increasing and strengthening internal relationships with staff across Metro North. We have increased staff awareness and education in consumer engagement, resulting in an increase in consumer involvement in activities across the organisation, building an even stronger patient-centred care culture.’

8 things we learnt from our Citizen Space and Dialogue user group, London 2017

We had a really fantastic and inspiring day at our London 2017 user group last week. For the second year running we were grateful to be hosted by The Department of Health (DH) in Whitehall. The room was full, with over 40 Delib customers, and we were treated to a really good variety of presentations.

Read on for my top takeaways from the day.

We heard from DH about what they have learnt about who they consult with, using insight from their Citizen Space, and BEIS about how Citizen Space has helped them to improve their internal processes with regard to preparing and publishing consultations with policy colleagues.

Network Rail talked about the approach they take to communicating with 15 million people per year, and we heard from Camden Council about their upcoming consultation using Dialogue to start a two-way conversation with residents about the future of the borough.

West Sussex Council talked about how they use Citizen Space for more than just public consultations, and how this has saved them money, and time.

In amongst that:

  • Michelle from The Democratic Society talked about some examples of consultation best practice from around the world.
  • Andy from Delib gave an overview of product updates in 2017, including the fact that Citizen Space usage continues to grow and that growth is speeding up – there are now upwards of 11,400 consultations published to our Citizen Space Aggregator.
  • Louise from Delib shared examples of some of the many really interesting and high profile consultations that have been published on Citizen Space in the last 12 months.

Here are eight things we heard from customers on the day that we think could be useful for others:

  • Citizen Space can help organisations to understand who they are consulting with, (and therefore who they are not consulting with). This insight can help to demonstrate to others where targeted communication needs to happen, to maximise responses from those whose voices need to be heard.
  • Target your communications, but then be sure to sustain those communications throughout the period of the consultation, rather than just at the outset. This will increase the likelihood of yielding higher response rates.
  • Because Citizen Space enables analysis straight away and while the consultation is still open, it is possible to see where the gaps are and target communications dynamically.
  • Making use of as much imagery as possible (maps, charts, pictures etc) will make consultations much more accessible and inviting. We all know this, but it can sometimes be easy to miss out, if there is a tight deadline, or if image copyright is difficult to get around.
  • Be creative with the tools that you already have – we heard from West Sussex about how they are using Citizen Space for things other than consultation, such as application forms, library competitions etc. Our customer described this as ‘being naughty’ but we fully support it!
  • It can sometimes feel like a risk to give people the opportunity and responsibility to have their say but, more often than not, participants will rise to that challenge and respond positively – wise words from Shane at Camden. We couldn’t agree more!
  • Genuine buy-in at a high level can really help to enable more open engagement. For members of staff who might feel nervous about opening discussion up with the public, it can really help to have express senior permission.
  • If you enable the public to ask questions openly, you can then provide the answers openly, which saves time for all involved – why answer the same question privately over and over again?

And finally, from my perspective, having that many customers in one room, sharing their own learning and experiences with each other was really wonderful, and like I said at the start, very inspiring.

So, all in all, a great day. We’re already making plans for next year’s user groups, and for those of you in that part of the world, our Canberra user group is coming up – on Thursday 26th October.

Have a look at the Delib twitter feed for our real-time take on the day.

Ration Club – Newspeak House, London, Wed Oct 11

Ration Book

Delib are excited to be hosting/chef-ing at Newspeak House’s Ration Club, on Wednesday 11th October evening.

For those who have never been, Ration Club is a regular Wednesday night fixture at Newspeak House where people from the political/democracy and civic tech community get together to eat and share ideas.

The format is based around a communal supper, where a Newspeak House member cooks a giant spread, with donations encouraged from the attendees.

The mix of people and conversation is always varied (the last time we attended, for example, we got to meet a French entrepreneur who was had a built an AI-powered ‘political robot’…)

The event’s open to all, so come along if you’re free (and drop us an email, just so we can make sure we cook enough spag bol 😉

Thoughts from Local GovCamp 2017

This weekend, Local GovCamp 2017 (the UK’s largest unconference on all things digital and government) was in Delib’s home city of Bristol for the first time.

We’ve attended UK GovCamp and Local GovCamp for many years, and we have a good history of staff blogs from earlier this year, 2014, 2013 and 2011.

Although I’m not unfamiliar with government/tech type unconferences, (I help organise Open Data Camp), this was my first ever Local GovCamp and I was really looking forward to attending. I missed the Fringe Friday, so it was just the Saturday ‘unconference proper’ for me – which, like all unconferences, started off with a long list of really interesting sounding pitches from a real variety of people.

I opted to start the day with a session called “Are we still innovating?” which was a great discussion, and, for me, certainly set the theme for the day. Whilst there have clearly been great leaps in recent years, there are still some major issues and frustrations which are sometimes felt keenly by those working in or with Local Government (I say this as someone who has been both the Local Gov customer and supplier in the last 12 months). In the spirit of Local GovCamp, this first discussion touched on some of the frustrations and disappointments but focused on the positives.

I’m a big fan of the unconference “Rule of two-feet” which encourages attendees to get up and move around between sessions, so was able to make the most of the packed agenda. Throughout the day I was in sessions about using NLP to improve communication within the context of Agile coaching; lessons on ideal team size learnt from working on a submarine; GDPR; chatbots and council websites; the risks and opportunities of Artificial Intelligence; and two different sessions on innovation within the context of digital government. And this doesn’t include the interesting conversations I was in, or overheard, in the corridors!

There was certainly plenty to think about following such a packed day, and my main takeaways are as follows:

Local Government is certainly still innovating

It can often be hard to take stock of how far we have come when change is such a constant. But having looked at the takeaways from the previous Delib blogs, it is clear to me that plenty of the ‘hot topics’ for innovation from 2011 or 2013 are now becoming much more par for the course, if not yet business as usual everywhere. For example, terms like ‘Digital by Default’, ‘Agile Working’ or ‘Open Data’ are now discussed as norms rather than ‘new’ things or ways in which government is innovating.

It is (still) really hard for Local Government to easily buy the right thing

There are all sorts of really good reasons why we have procurement rules for the public sector. However, there was a clear consensus that procurement processes can really hamper innovation, and can also be a real barrier for SME’s seeking to engage with Government. This was also touched upon during one of my ‘overheard corridor conversations’: “…Yes of course we need to keep innovating, but that doesn’t mean we don’t also all need to engage more and better with existing things like G Cloud that could really support innovation if more councils and suppliers engaged with it”.

We need to bring more people into the conversation

One of the session pitches was “Help! I’m an Elected Member!” which drew a big cheer from the crowd, (seemingly it is quite rare for anyone other than Officers to make it to these kinds of events). Certainly, there was a desire to find better ways to spread the word and share successes more broadly, and some were worried that there was a risk of only ‘preaching to the converted’.

It’s all about the people

Perhaps a cheesy way to finish up – but I’m afraid in my experience, it’s true. Anyone feeling disheartened by the challenges and frustrations of Local Government would do well to attend Local GovCamp and see how many brilliant, knowledgeable and dynamic people there are out there working hard to bring digital transformation to Government in all corners of the UK. And, yes, we do need to keep innovating, but judging by Local GovCamp last weekend, I have no doubt we will.

Introducing our newest researcher: Megan Tonner

Delib keeps on growing – both in number of customers and number of staff. One of the several new-ish recruits is Megan, joining our UK office as a researcher. As is now standard procedure, she’s completed our comprehensive set of taxing questions about bands, bread and, of course, biscuits.

What is your name and where are you from?
My name is Megan Tonner. I was born in Banbury, North Oxfordshire, with Scottish heritage. Growing up there meant I was lucky to live in a beautiful, picturesque village called Bloxham, with fields directly following my back gate – meaning I could escape in the countryside for a run with my gorgeous Hungarian Vizsla, Ede. (Which, by the way, often began as a relaxing stroll, until he’d decide to do a full “Fenton” on me and chase every sheep or pheasant we passed.)

I went to school in Bloxham, and even got to do a GCSE in Environmental and Land-Based Science – in other words, ‘Farming’ – where I literally had to sing to cows (email me for cattle-related tips). I moved to Bristol four years ago to study Graphic Design at UWE and fell in love with the city. Never had I lived in such a liberal place and I’m very excited about my future here.

Favourite band and/or artist?
I’m finding this extremely hard to answer – I’m rather peculiar when it comes to my taste in music! My favourite genre is Math rock (I know, it’s a bit niche and sounds like I’m trying to be hip.) It’s a genre that was influenced by post-hardcore and progressive rock bands. Try out Chiyoda Ku, a band from Bristol that I discovered on a trip to The Stag and Hounds. Or, if you’re super keen, come along to ArcTangent festival just outside of Bristol.

Moving on from that my taste ranges from anything like old school R&B to minimal techno and 140 Dubstep. Hit me up for a playlist. But if I were only allowed to listen to one band for the rest of my life, I guess it would be The Red Hot Chili Peppers.

Creature of habit or maverick thinker?
I really wish I were a creature of habit; I try, I make lists sometimes and then throw them away when I find them lost in my laundry basket a week later. I speak my mind, often a little too quickly but I do have to have some sort of routine to my life, that’s why I love working. Especially now I’ve found something I’m passionate about.

You get mysteriously transported to a desert island, with only time to grab a couple of precious things to take with you. What makes the ‘keep’ list?
If time allowed, a painting of my interpretation of a Chinese New Year that I did with my father when I was 14. It’s still one of my favourite pieces of art work I’ve done to this day, and it’s priceless, as painting with my dad is one of my most sentimental memories of my childhood. I’d also grab my electric guitar, that we built together too. Finally, my collection of Harry Potter replica wands, because they’re obviously the coolest things I own.

Biscuits – dunk or leave unsullied?
I don’t have a sweet tooth really, let alone a soggy sweet tooth… Throw me a bag of salt and vinegar Kettle Chips over a biscuit any day.

Before joining Delib, how did you put bread on the table?
When I applied for this position, I was working in PieMinister, which I know sounds like the dream. I served pies, I made pies, I spoke all things pie. I loved the part of hospitality in which you were meeting hundreds of new people a week – but the job wasn’t too exhilarating, or pushing, and after a short while there’s only a certain amount of pie one girl can eat. I was also a games journalist, and just before that worked for Samsung, training staff in different stores on their new tablet releases. But I was a student, so until now I didn’t have the time to find something that tingled my taste buds and motivated me as much as Delib has. I’m a tech-head at heart, and it’s amazing to be back in that industry.

Why did you want to join Delib?
Delib is a company that’s truly doing something I believe in, something innovating, and something anyone would be lucky to be involved in. After a few interviews, and meeting the fabulous staff here, I realised it was somewhere I’d be comfortable being myself, excited about my day, and more importantly enthusiastic about the subjects we work in. As well as constantly learning and developing through the process of being here.

Any shout outs, comments or other musings?
Thank you Delib, and everyone within the company, that have kept me smiling since I started my position in January. What a load of beauties!

Digital Hero: Deb Thomas, Australian Treasury

We are really thrilled to introduce you to our newest Digital Hero, Deb Thomas. Deb is the
Web Manager for the Australian Treasury (on secondment from the Department of Industry, Innovation and Science).

Deb’s role involves managing priorities, to keep on top of publishing content to the sites under Treasury’s portfolio – while, at the same time, implementing digital transformation in the department. Deb is constantly striving to deliver the best digital content that she can!

Over to you Deb…

1. What’s your name and where are you from?
Deb Thomas. I’m originally from the warm and humid environment of Darwin in Australia.
Unfortunately, now I’m in Canberra. Freezing!

2. What do you do for a living?
I manage government websites. I’ve spent quite a few years at the Department of Industry, Innovation and Science running the web team, and I’m currently doing a secondment at the Australian Treasury, where at last count we have over 20 websites to manage.

3. Favourite band and/or artist?
Probably The Beatles – a classic band that will always be up there (I’ll be seeing Paul
McCartney live in concert at the end of the year which is quite exciting). Also really enjoy
listening to Angus and Julia Stone who produce some great music. Of the Disney movie
soundtracks I have to listen to at home, Moana is the least irritating.

4. Creature of habit or maverick thinker?
I’m quite a creature of habit socially – as in, I’ll habitually cancel any plans we make or hope that someone else cancels them. At work, I would say I’m much more maverick: “why do it the way you’ve always done it when you could do it better and easier?”

5. Biscuits – dunk or leave unsullied?
I don’t drink tea…. The shock of everyone dropping their cups of tea at this very moment. All of my biscuits are unsullied.

6. What does digital democracy mean to you (or maybe, what should digital democracy mean)?
Digital democracy is the next step in citizen engagement. It allows everyone to be given the same platform – it levels the ground for everyone to offer their voice, opinion and needs to government and corporations. The availability of the internet in Australia means that very few miss out and we can all impact policy development.

7. Where do you see the field of digital democracy/ digital engagement in ten years?
Opportunities and pitfalls?
I think that citizen engagement through digital tools will be a lot bigger than it is now; it will hopefully be the default step government takes with stakeholder engagement.

The reach provided will be increased in an easy and cost-effective manner which in turn will allow more to engagement opportunities, giving government a richer context to work with.

The downside to this will be if we can’t find a way to improve the level of conversation we (as a society), have online – the too-fast turnaround of information, the summary versions
rather than the full picture and people’s obsession with trolling leads to a less valuable
conversation.

If we can all mature to use the digital tools for a meaningful conversation, then we will see much more input and value given to those with the quietest voice. And hopefully some hashtags disappear (#fakenews).

8. Best project you’ve worked on at Treasury? Are there any projects coming up that you would like to highlight?
Working through the delivery of the Commonwealth Budget was very interesting – so much going on that I didn’t understand, but I was surrounded by lots of very smart and dedicated people working hard.

9. Any shout-outs?
The Department of Industry and Australian Treasury for allowing me to encourage new tools and be digital, and all the people who work here who come to me and let me take them into the world of web.

And James from Delib who lets me ask questions multiple times and understands that I have never completed the task I said I was going to do!

—–

There we go – finishing up with a compliment we didn’t even fish for! Thanks to Deb for the insight into her work, thoughts and views on the digital space and stakeholder engagement. We look forward to following the digital transformation at Treasury.

We’re Hiring – Office Manager

Delib is a global digital democracy company of around 25 people, providing digital tools to connect citizens with government. Our main office, a grade 2 listed building, is on King Street in Bristol and we have staff working in Australia and New Zealand. Here in the UK, we share the Bristol office with our sister company, Rubber Republic, who write, shoot and distribute fantastic online films. We are a well-established and growing business.

We’re looking for a new Office Manager for Delib (we’re also recruiting for another new Office Manager for Rubber Republic). The Office Manager role is integral to the support and success of Delib and you will have a lot of autonomy and accountability from day one. Your colleagues are excellent, the working environment is open and friendly and the role carries a lot of responsibility and trust.

Your role is split into two:

  1. Supporting Delib staff in Australia, New Zealand and the UK. This includes a wide range of company operations, including (but not limited to) HR, recruitment, event support, finance, systems, suppliers and information security.
  2. Supporting the office in general such as covering phones, intercom, general admin, building management and facilities. These tasks will be shared with our part-time Office Manager Jayne and the new Office Manager for Rubber Republic, so you must work well together to ensure nothing gets dropped.

You need to think globally. Delib is a registered company in Australia, New Zealand and the UK and each territory has a range of essential and varying operational requirements. We also have customers in other areas of the world. You will be responsible for ensuring the requirements for each territory are met and for supporting each company, wherever needed. You’ll have a big to do list and lots of different staff members relying on you to keep all the plates spinning – we need an excellent organiser. The ability to prioritise the needs of staff from all territories and constantly maintain communication across all territories is key. You’ll be proactive, ensuring that we operate effectively on a global, not just local scale.

Due to differing time zones, you will need to be flexible and adapt your working hours to accommodate calls in the early morning and late evening when needed.

In a nutshell, your role is to support the company and the people in it. This can range from clearing out the fridge to resolving HR issues, making insurance claims and organising company events. Therefore, it is essential that you have a positive and helpful attitude so that the team feel comfortable asking you for help. You must be able to keep calm under pressure, problem solve and re-prioritise your work load at short notice.

 

Key responsibilities – The needs of each territory can vary, but this is a general overview.

  • Systems and suppliers: Be responsible for Delib’s password and supplier systems and any other records essential to business operations. Ensure that our suppliers comply with company policy and that services meet company needs, including insurance policies. Organise the diary so that we don’t miss essential renewals and deadlines.
  • Tech and equipment: Manage our equipment (allocation, configuration and return) and resolve problems with staff laptops or other office equipment including the phone system.
  • Human Resources: Oversee all aspects of the recruitment process: posting job ads, processing applications, holding phone interviews, inducting new starters and following the process for leavers. Look after aspects of HR for current staff including arranging training, holidays and sickness management, involvement in disputes and disciplinary processes.
  • Finance: complete all aspects of monthly payroll, report purchases to the Finance Manager and support the finance team as required. Resolve any issues with credit cards and company accounts.
  • Information Security: Work with the Information Security team to create, implement and follow policy to ensure that company operations and the building systems are secure. Assist with internal and external audits in line with ISO 27001. Understand our policy, flag any risks, report and respond to security incidents and work to promote best practice.
  • Events and support: Organise event bookings, trips, company away days and travel itineraries.

 

UK only

  • Building Management: Ensure the utilities in the entire building operate as expected and be a first point of contact for the other businesses renting space. Liaise with the building owners to ensure that any issues are resolved. This includes organising repairs, managing security and key holders, running Health & Safety tests, organising services and liaising with the cleaners.
  • Facilities Management: The working environment needs to be as pleasant as possible with all equipment fully functioning including computers, printers and the telephone system. Be responsible for the renewal of supplier contracts, organising repairs, Health & Safety obligations and training, managing meeting rooms and ordering in supplies as needed.
  • Reception cover: Handle incoming calls and cover the intercom to welcome visitors and collect any post and deliveries.

 

Knowledge & Experience

  • 2 years of experience in a similar Office Manager role or with managing teams. You should have experience in a role with high levels of responsibility.
  • HR experience – dealing with sensitive HR processes/issues and being entrusted with confidential information.
  • Highly computer literate, specifically experience with using Apple Mac laptops would be beneficial. Must be very confident with setting up and using Excel and Word documents and generally proficient navigating systems and databases.
  • Confident and professional telephone manner.

 

Personal Attributes

  • Thrive on working autonomously and able to prioritise, plan and organise effectively to manage a diverse workload, even when under pressure.
  • Have confidence to make suggestions and influence change.
  • Highly developed communication skills with an open and transparent approach.
  • A personable down to earth nature, able to work at all levels.
  • Personal integrity and discretion.
  • Willingness to learn, try new things and progress.

 

Salary and benefits

  • This is a full-time position and we offer a salary of £24 – £30K per annum depending. on experience.
  • 24 days of holiday, plus bank holidays.
  • Company pension scheme.
  • Enjoyable working environment in an excellent location.
  • Training budget.
  • Your own Mac which you can take home if you wish.
  • Decent chairs and desk setup.
  • Fruit boxes delivered twice a week and a kitchen packed with tea and coffee.

 

Recruitment Process

  • We are hoping to hire and train both Office Managers for Rubber Republic and Delib as soon as practically possible. You will be invited to a phone interview, face to face interview and then a trial period in the office to give you a good feel for the role.
  • If you think you are the right person for this role, please send your cover letter and CV to Lorna@teamrubber.com. Applications that do not include a cover letter will not be accepted.
  • We follow the HMG Baseline Personnel Security Standard and you will therefore need to satisfy basic eligibility criteria/certain conditions of employment (e.g. nationality rules/right to work); and provide appropriate documentation to verify ID, nationality, employment and/or academic history, criminal record (unspent convictions only).
  • No applications will be accepted via recruitment companies. Closing date: As soon as the right applicant is found.

 

Introducing our 2017 London and Canberra User Groups

After kicking off our 2017 user groups in Scotland and Northern Ireland in April and May, we’re now firmly looking ahead to our next 2017 user groups in London and Canberra. The Department of Health have kindly agreed to co-host the London event with us on Wednesday 11th October in their Westminster office. Hot on the heels of our London user group, we’re also getting plans in place for our Australian user group which will be in Canberra in late October.

In 2016, we ran no fewer than 5 user groups around the world: kicking off in Scotland before heading to Australia and finishing up in London. If you’re not sure what to expect, check out these learnings from our user group in London last year.

BIS-Digtial-Engagement-300x135
Image courtesy of @beisgovuk the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (UK)

Who is the user group for?
Site Admins, Digital leads, analysts, policy leads, communication managers – anyone using Citizen Space or Dialogue.

1-2 people will be initially invited from each organisation currently using Citizen Space or Dialogue. Tickets are free and will be allocated on a first-come-first-served basis. If you’re reading this and interested in speaking on the day, please email us.

What should I expect?
Talks will focus on all things digital engagement; our previous user groups have included:

  • An opportunity to meet fellow customers from across government
  • Show-and-tell of recent or upcoming engagement exercises by current users
  • Review of the process and challenges of how you do consultation
  • Roadmaps – we’ll talk through our plans for development and get your input
  • Digital surgery on any questions/topics requested

These sessions work best with real examples from the coal-face. If you’re interested in sharing how you do great consultation or if you have a proven process please get in touch.